Renée Zellweger is living the American dream.

On Monday, the “Judy” star, 50, was nominated for an Oscar for her work in the film, portraying famed performer Judy Garland.

Zellweger recently spoke with Vanity Fair for its 2020 Hollywood Issue about today’s political climate and her experience as a child of immigrant parents.

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“I’m the American dream,” said the actress, who was born to a Swiss father and a Norwegian mother. “Yeah, it’s definitely interesting today. It’s a very strange time. There’s a lot of fear, and then uncertainty. I wonder where that comes from.

“I know that things we consider to be fundamental, in terms of feeling secure, and how we define ourselves in our lives and lifestyles are shifting quickly,” she continued. “I get it. And technology has just amplified that.”

The star added that she still has hope for a brighter future “because great things come out of adversity.”

Just over a week ago, Zellweger nabbed a Golden Globe for her role in “Judy,” and stunned the audience with her use of an in-and-out Southern accent during her acceptance speech.

Viewers immediately took to social media to express their confusion about the 50-year-old.

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In her speech, Zellweger spoke about returning to Hollywood for a film that critics have been hailing as a comeback performance.

“Wow, I really am up here,” said Zellweger. “Well, hi everybody, it’s nice to see you. Y’all look pretty good 17 years later. Thank you to the [Hollywood Foreign Press Association, the Globes’ organizing body] for inviting me back to the family reunion, especially with all these extraordinary ladies this year.”

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“I mean it, your work moves me. It moves me,” she continued. “And I’ve been cheering for y’all from theater seats for a long time.”

Zellweger also honored Garland in the speech.

“Celebrating one of the great icons of our time with you has been one of my great life blessings,” she said, “And the conversations I’ve had with people internationally who just want to express their love for Judy Garland and tell about the great personal significance of her legacy and humanity has been a great reminder that the choices we make matter, what we make matters, and how we choose to honor each other in our lifetimes can matter a great deal down the road.”

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This was Zellweger’s fourth Golden Globe win. She won her first Golden Globe in 2001 for her rule in “Nurse Betty.” The next came in 2003 for “Chicago,” followed by 2004 for “Cold Mountain.”

Fox News’ Stephanie Nolasco contributed to this report.